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 Curriculum

 

 

Expand Your Global Business Knowledge and Skill

The curriculum includes an integrative selection of coursework along with a master thesis that students will complete by the end of the year. In addition to receiving a strong grounding in global business frameworks, students will learn to effectively work in international settings and as members of cross-cultural teams as well as move skillfully between American, Chinese, and European business environments. 

 

McIntire School of Commerce

 

Corporate governance concerns the relationship between managers and a firm’s other stakeholder groups, including shareholders, employees, and the larger community. This seminar introduces students to fundamental theories of corporate governance and explores how governance practices differ across countries. Key areas of focus include the composition and structure of corporate boards, executive compensation practices, the market for corporate control, and the role of external monitors. We consider how institutional context shapes these governance practices and what implications they have for firm performance and strategy. We also discuss how globalization is driving changes in governance and examine different perspectives on what practices are “best” for international organizations.

 

Students will develop their ability to communicate and collaborate effectively in cross-cultural environments and as members and leaders of teams. The course seeks to develop students' self-awareness, sensitivity to others, and the ability to manage interpersonal relations. Students also will sharpen their managerial speaking and writing skills. Special topics will include the role of language and nonverbal expression, the changing nature of work, virtual teams, emerging communication technologies, the use of professional and corporate narratives, and negotiation.

 

This course aims to provide students with a managerial toolkit of research and analytical skills while also demonstrating the wide range of managerial situations in which quantitative analysis is necessary and relevant. Through case studies and use of current analytical tools and techniques, students will gain experience in solving business problems, supporting decision-making and strategy, and communicating analytical results. The class will explore how international and global firms use metrics and analysis to make operational and strategic decisions.

 

Students will identify and defend a thesis topic, develop a collection of significant literature underpinning the topic, develop and refine research methodology for the thesis, present their thesis proposal ideas for class critique, and defend a thesis proposal. The end product of the fall session will be an approved thesis proposal. That approved thesis proposal will launch thesis research during spring session abroad to cumulate in a formal thesis defense in late spring session.  

 

These courses are designed to help students understand the three regional contexts in which they will be studying as well as the similarities and differences among them. The first course will examine the business context of the United States. The second course will examine the business context of China, including Taiwan and Hong Kong.  Finally, the third course will consider the business context of the European Union, with a special consideration of the challenges faced by the Eurozone countries. Each course will examine the practical implications for both domestic and global companies in a variety of industries.

 

 

Lingnan (University) College

 

This course leads students to investigate key operational issues in managing global operations and supply chains. It delivers latest theories, principles, and methods of modern operations management and supply chain management in global business. The course relies on a combination of case discussions, lectures, readings, and assignments. The principal pedagogy for this course is instructor-led group discussion of the results of quantitative and qualitative analyses performed by students prior to class.

 

The purpose of this course is to study the process of consumer decision-making and its determinants, and the resulting implications for marketing strategy. Concepts and theories covered in this course are essential for consumer analysis and the development of effective marketing strategies. A strategic orientation will permeate most facets of this course. At the same time, knowledge of consumer behavior requires an understanding of important theoretical concepts borrowed from fields such as psychology, sociology, and economics.

 

The main objective of this course is to provide today’s (non-) financial managers with a sufficient understanding of fundamental concepts and tools of financial management in international settings necessary to be effective global managers. The course starts with reviewing the institutional arrangements and valuation of various financial instruments, such as currency forward, currency futures, and currency options and swaps. Then we will discuss how to use those instruments to effectively hedging a firm' s exposure to exchange rate risk. Finally, we will examine the international dimensions of financing and capital budgeting. The course will have a strong applied orientation. A significant emphasis will be placed on practical techniques and the solutions of problems.

 

These courses are designed to help students understand the three regional contexts in which they will be studying as well as the similarities and differences among them. The first course will examine the business context of the United States. The second course will examine the business context of China, including Taiwan and Hong Kong.  Finally, the third course will consider the business context of the European Union, with a special consideration of the challenges faced by the Eurozone countries. Each course will examine the practical implications for both domestic and global companies in a variety of industries.

 

 

ESADE Business School

 

The management of intangible assets is becoming one of the main sources of differentiation against competition. Among all intangible assets, the brand is considered to be one of the most important assets. Throughout the course we will review both seminal and advanced concepts of the brand management practice all of them illustrated by brand cases across different industries and geographies. By the end of the course, students will be able to develop successful brand strategies to manage brands in different business situations.

 

Students will familiarize themselves with the key aspects of the entrepreneurial process in the context of new venture creation: how entrepreneurs discover and evaluate opportunities, develop and validate business models, assess the feasibility of their plans, attract external resources and investors, obtain financing, and communicate their ideas to external stakeholders. In addition, students will develop their ability to lead an innovative project or company beyond the scope of a startup: how to explore and exploit innovation opportunities, how to apply different innovation frameworks, and how to lead innovation strategies while managing uncertainty.

 

The objective of the course is to present the students with some tools and methodologies to understand, interpret, and manage sustainability in a corporate setting. Different companies refer to sustainability management using different terms such as CSR, compliance, social impact, or shared value among others, but for our purposes these are all synonymous. The goal is to understand how sustainability issues can have an impact in all units and departments of the organization and generate value for the company as well as for society. Therefore, the aim is to understand how sustainability can become an integral part of the business model, and thus a source of competitiveness, embedding sustainability practices throughout the organization and designing innovative solutions through Bottom of the Pyramid, frugal and reverse innovation, and social entrepreneurship frameworks.

 

The goal of this course is to understand the complex world of strategic alliances seen as an integrated process rather than watertight compartments of finance, business policy, and human resources. By the end of the course, the participants should have grasped the complexity of merger & acquisition operations and be well aware of the risks they entail. Students should also have learned how to increase the success factor of the operations in which they take part.

 

These courses are designed to help students understand the three regional contexts in which they will be studying as well as the similarities and differences among them. The first course will examine the business context of the United States. The second course will examine the business context of China, including Taiwan and Hong Kong.  Finally, the third course will consider the business context of the European Union, with a special consideration of the challenges faced by the Eurozone countries. Each course will examine the practical implications for both domestic and global companies in a variety of industries.

 

*Course information is currently accurate but is subject to change.

 

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